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All Posts Tagged: Research

effects of alcohol and marijuana

A Drunken Haze: The Problem with Mixing Booze and Pot

Source: A Drunken Haze: The Problem with Mixing Booze and Pot

The Canadian government is trying to prepare the country for when it legalizes marijuana. While a regulatory framework is still in progress, the distribution of marijuana has been a highly discussed topic.

The most likely result is that the Federal government will be controlling the marijuana supply with provinces left to deal with distribution. Among the different possible distribution concepts, Ontario has been leaning heavily on the idea of distributing recreational marijuana through the LCBO.

Though it seems to be a  common choice as a distribution model for a controlled substance, there are a few  things to consider.

Alcohol Bottles Lined Up

Finding a Marijuana Distribution Method That Works

The first challenge that the LCBO model distribution method faces is that it could stifle the market for purchasing marijuana. With the exception of The Beer Store, distilleries, breweries and wineries, LCBO is the only major retail outlet licensed to distribute alcohol in Ontario.

In fact, restaurants and bars are generally required by law to purchase their liquor from LCBO.  With what is expected to be a billion dollar business in Ontario, should this be another government-controlled monopoly that is tacked on to an existing government-controlled monopoly?

With the certainty of extremely limited availability and supply and the related concerns regarding stigma of purchasing marijuana, potentially in front of children, the public would most certainly not benefit from an LCBO-based distribution model.

With many marijuana dispensaries popping up, it is not hard to imagine how this model may change the market when applied to marijuana distribution:

  • Taxation and competitive pricing would be set by the government, controlling the market value of marijuana and perhaps underestimating  or overestimating black market prices and current market dynamics.
  • Smaller marijuana producers and distributors would be put at a disadvantage, if not wiped out,  if the government favours larger, licensed producers for their supply and only government controlled outlets for distribution. Implementing infrastructure regarding sales and distribution would threaten the economic potential for the creation of new businesses.
  • The level of knowledge of LCBO employees. When compared to the experience of small dispensary owners, an unspecialized employee wouldn’t inspire much confidence in paying customers.

Using Alcohol and Marijuana Together

A second obvious side effect of distributing through the LCBO is that it would provide ample opportunity for people to purchase marijuana and alcohol at the same time. Though it is enough to cite health reasons for why alcohol and marijuana shouldn’t be mixed, it’s no mystery that both are already being used together. It is known as cross fading.

Marijuana Leaf Close Up

When used individually, each substance comes with its own negative impact on the brain. When combined, the effects of alcohol and marijuana can be amplified and increased. For instance, using both substances together can worsen the impact on your motor skills, leading to a higher risk of a car accident than if you had used either substance alone. Drunk driving and driving while high is another issue to contend with.

Most notably, the order in which you consume either substance also has an impact on the resulting effect. If you get drunk when already high from marijuana, you experience the pleasing effect one would expect from being drunk and high.  Yet, if you drink alcohol before marijuana, the resulting effects are dizziness, vomiting, anxiety, and feeling sick after ingesting too much THC, otherwise known as greening out.

According to a study by the American Association for Clinical Chemistry (AACC), mixing alcohol with marijuana increases the THC concentration in a person’s blood. Alcohol increases marijuana metabolitesin the bloodstream. With alcohol targeting the nervous system and blood vessels, the absorption rate of THC can increase and hence cause a person to “green out.”

Conventional wisdom would suggest that selling two things that don’t go well together is a bad idea.  There’s a reason why you can’t smoke while pumping gas – it’s dangerous – or why you’d never sell fireworks in a children’s toy shop.

It also makes sense why laws are stricter concerning drug offences near schools.  If the government wants to highlight the concerns regarding drinking and smoking – it would seem an obvious step to take would be to physically separate the distribution of these distinct, controlled substances.

So is selling recreational marijuana in close proximity to alcohol a good idea?  In our opinion, it’s not smart policy.  This is just one question among many that are still being asked and used to guide the direction in which the government will go, and there are recommendations being submitted on the overall policy.

Thus, hopefully, through open discussion and more research, the legislation will be able to accommodate both public and private points of sale.

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Marijuana to fight skin cancer in major human trial

One of the world’s first large, controlled trials of cannabis for melanoma launches in Australia
Marijuana is being called in to fight one of the world’s deadliest, scariest killers — a type of cancer caused by your next summer vacation.

Researchers at the University of Canberra have announced a $1 million research project with Israel-based Cann Pharmaceutical to see if the compounds in pot kill live cancer cells in humans as well as they do inside test tubes and mice in the labs.

Starting next year, patients will get medical-grade, whole plant extracts of specific cannabis strains alongside their current standard of care for melanoma. About 55,000 Australians have the dangerous cancer of the skin, which can be caused by sun damage to skin cell DNA. Less than ten percent of patients survive skin cancer that has spread underneath the surface of the skin.

“Australians have the highest rate of melanoma in the world, with estimates of more than 13,000 new cases to be diagnosed in 2016 alone,” said University of Canberra Professor of molecular and cellular biology Sudha Rao. “When you consider that melanoma is the third most common cancer in Australia and New Zealand, and almost 1,800 people will die as a result of this cancer this year, we need to work harder at finding effective treatments.”

The active molecules secreted by the cannabis plant, the cannabinoids have been shown — in various cell, and animal and very small human trials — to contain the potential to cause cancer cell death (apoptosis) and prevent cancer’s acquisition of blood supplies (by blocking angiogenesis).

Countless patient self-reports also attest to the use of topical cannabinoids to treat cancerous skin lesions.

Large-scale, double-blind placebo controlled human trials should commence immediately. However, the United States government — which funds the majority of the world’s cancer research — treats cannabis as the most dangerous drug on the planet, alongside street heroin and the hallucinogen LSD. Opioids like OxyContin and Vicodin are deemed safer.

U.S. lawmakers this year are working to cut the red tape on pot research. Their bill has bipartisan support, but is caught up on election season politics. In response, various states created medical cannabis research programs using pot tax dollars, local crops, and state research institutions.

A pure pill form of cannabis’ main active ingredient, THC, (which causes euphoria) has been around since 1985. By contrast, CannPharmaceutical specializes in whole plant formulations.

“The effects of all these compounds working together and regulating each other will be much different than the effects of any one compound working alone, which is why synthetic cannabis drugs produced of only one compound are reported in most case studies by patients to lack the effectiveness of whole plant medicine,” the company states. “… cannabis is a composition of many different compounds that work together to produce a faster and better outcome. Alter this – you lose the effect.”

Read More – > http://blog.sfgate.com/smellthetruth/2016/07/06/marijuana-to-fight-skin-cancer-in-major-human-trial/

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raw cannabis cures lupus

The Power of Raw Cannabis

This is a must-watch video featuring some of the top researchers on the healing effects of Cannabis (Marijuana) in it’s raw form, eaten or juiced. Eating raw cannabis as medicine, dietary essential: new research. Cannabis is a dietary essential that helps all cell types function more effectively. Is a medicine: anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant, probably has some direct activity against cancerous cells. This plant can do phenomenal things, but not if you aren’t taking a high enough dose.

raw marijuana

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S. Carolina – Senate panel forwards medical marijuana bill

Senate panel forwards medical marijuana extract bill

A South Carolina Senate subcommittee on Thursday advanced a bill that would allow the clinical testing of cannabidiol oil (CBD), which is derived from the marijuana plant.

The oil has been used to treat severe forms of epilepsy, but is illegal in South Carolina. The bill by Sen. Tom Davis, R-Beaufort, seeks an exemption for the medical marijuana extract that does not include the THC chemical that creates the marijuana “high” sensation. It now heads to the full Senate Medical Affairs Committee.

Dori Lovell of Summerville told senators Thursday that the legislation is moving too slowly for her three-year old grandson Julian, who was born with a brain disorder and suffers from severe seizures. Lovell openly sobbed as she said her daughter and family left their support system, their jobs, and the state in an attempt to seek relief for her grandson.

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Medical marijuana research for PTSD nears federal approval

The Obama administration handed backers of medical marijuana a significant victory Friday, opening the way for a University of Arizona researcher to examine whether pot can help veterans cope with post-traumatic stress, a move that could lead to broader studies into potential benefits of the drug.

For years, scientists who have wanted to study how marijuana might be used to treat illness say they have been stymied by resistance from federal drug officials.

The Arizona study had long ago been sanctioned by the Food and Drug Administration, but under federal rules, such experiments can use marijuana only from a single, government-run farm in Mississippi. Researchers say that the agency which oversees the farm, the National Institute on Drug Abuse, has long been hostile to proposals aimed at examining possible benefits of the drug.

“This is a great day,” said the Arizona researcher, Suzanne A. Sisley, clinical assistant professor of psychology at the university’s medical school, who has been trying to get the green light for her study for three years. “The merits of a rigorous scientific trial have finally trumped politics.

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700 medical cannabis studies sorted by disease

Medical marijuana uses – 700 medical marijuana clinical studies and papers

NEW! Now in PDF form 700 clinical studies PDF andHERE

 

700 uses of Medical Marijuana | Sorted by Disease | ADD – Wilson’s Disease | Links to 700 Clinical Studies | Medical Marijuana Reference | Cannabis as Medicine

Medical marijuana and cannabis studies A collection of clinical studies, papers and reference providing the ultimate resource for medical disorders helped by medical marijuana.

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Marijuana research hampered by access from government and politics, scientists say

Millions of ordinary Americans are now able to walk into a marijuana dispensary and purchase bags of pot on the spot for a variety of medical ailments. But if you’re a researcher like Sue Sisley, a psychiatrist who studies post-
traumatic stress disorder, getting access to the drug isn’t nearly so easy.

That’s because the federal government has a virtual monopoly on growing and cultivating marijuana for scientific research, and getting access to the drug requires three separate levels of approval.

Sisley’s fight to get samples for her study — now in its fourth month — illuminates the complex politics of marijuana in the United States.

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UA doctor gets key federal support for marijuana research

PHOENIX — A University of Arizona doctor has been given approval from a key government agency to conduct studies that could put the school at the forefront of medical-marijuana research.

The Public Health Service has said Dr. Suzanne Sisley can proceed with her plans to study whether the drug, which remains illegal under federal law, could be used to treat people with post-traumatic stress disorder. Sisley said this would be the first-ever study of its kind.

That approval, which came late last week, is not the final hurdle. She still needs permission from the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration.

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The Margolin Guide

Bruce Margolin is Synonymous With Fighting Weed Busts in California….. The Dean of Weed Defense Attorneys. He has Defended 25,000 Pot Cases and Timothy Leary. -La Weekly “Prop 19: Dreams of Legal Weed”

October, 2010/Vol.32/No.48

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