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All Posts Tagged: Medicinal Properties

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Marijuana May Alleviate America’s Opioid Crisis, New Study Suggests

Access to medical marijuana may be cutting down on the overall use of opioids, including prescription painkillers like OxyContin and Percocet, new research suggests.

In a study, researchers from Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health analyzed traffic fatality data from 1999-2013 for 18 U.S states. They found that most states that passed medical marijuana laws saw an overall reduction in fatal crashes involving drivers who tested positive for opioids.

“We would expect the adverse consequences of opioid use to decrease over time in states where medical marijuana use is legal, as individuals substitute marijuana for opioids in the treatment of severe or chronic pain,” lead author June H. Kim, a doctoral student at Mailman, said in a statement.

The study, published Thursday in the American Journal of Public Health, is among the first to look at the link between state medical marijuana laws and opioid use. Medical marijuana laws, the authors concluded, are “associated with reductions in opioid positivity among 21- to 40-year-old fatally injured drivers and may reduce opioid use and overdose.”

 

The United States is currently facing an epidemic of opioid painkiller abuse. Since 1999, opioid prescriptions and sales have quadrupled in the United States, a boom that the CDC said has “helped create and fuel” the current opioid abuse crisis. In 2014 alone, more than 14,000 people ― nearly 40 per day ― died from overdoses of prescribed opiates.

The Columbia study adds to a growing body of evidence showing cannabis can be an effective, alternative treatment for pain relief.

A 2014 study, for example, found that states with medical marijuana had fewer prescription painkiller overdose deaths than those without. And in July, researchers documented that states with medical marijuana saw a drop in prescription drugs,saving an estimated $165.2 million in Medicare costs.

In March, federal health officials issued new guidelines for opioid prescriptions in an effort to curb the crisis, urging doctors to largely avoid prescribing highly addictive painkillers like OxyContin and Vicodin when treating patients for chronic pain.

But the Drug Enforcement Administration has stopped short of embracing alternative painkillers, recently declining to loosen restrictions on marijuana and announcing plans to criminalize kratom, an herbal supplement that many say is effective at treating chronic pain and fighting opioid addiction.

At the state level, however, the tide is turning. Twenty-five U.S. states have legalized medical marijuana. Four of those, plus the District of Columbia, have also legalized recreational use of the substance.

“As states with these laws move toward legalizing marijuana more broadly for recreational purposes, future studies are needed to assess the impact these laws may have on opioid use,” Kim said in a statement.

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raw cannabis cures lupus

The Power of Raw Cannabis

This is a must-watch video featuring some of the top researchers on the healing effects of Cannabis (Marijuana) in it’s raw form, eaten or juiced. Eating raw cannabis as medicine, dietary essential: new research. Cannabis is a dietary essential that helps all cell types function more effectively. Is a medicine: anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant, probably has some direct activity against cancerous cells. This plant can do phenomenal things, but not if you aren’t taking a high enough dose.

raw marijuana

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The Epilepsy Foundation supports Alabama bill that would legalize medical marijuana oil

BIRMINGHAM, AL (WBRC) –

A national foundation announced support for laws that would make CBD, an oil derived from marijuana, legal for people suffering from seizures.

The Epilepsy Foundation announced its support for bills and laws like Carly’s Law Feb. 20. Dustin Chandler, Carly’s father, said the backing from the Epilepsy Foundation is “huge.” He’s hoping the new support will help Carly’s Law get out of the Alabama Senate and move the Alabama House.

Chandler said he’s fighting not only for his daughter Carly but for hundreds of other parents who have to watch their children take a cocktail of drugs to control their seizures.

“We have got children that suffer that need help,” said Chandler.

With support from the Epilepsy Foundation, Chandler said he feels progress in Montgomery may move a little faster.

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Marijuana, fine, but leave medicine out of it

I recently visited a medical-marijuana dispensary in Denver. I expected tie-dyed tapestries and Bob Marley posters. Instead, I found a well-designed shop that looked like any high-end health-supplement boutique.

The display cabinets were organized with various strains of marijuana and there were many non-smokable types, including transdermal patches, oral sprays and edibles. An employee proudly explained that in Colorado, dispensaries are required to grow at least 70 percent of their inventory, a boon to small operators. This particular dispensary grew 90 percent of its inventory and sourced the plants out to other small businesses that transformed them into the patches, sprays and edibles.

The business model was impressive. That the medical model was lacking soon became apparent.

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Marijuana: An Athlete’s Best Friend?

When it comes to drugs and sports, the topic is usually performance-enhancing drugs like steroids or strong opiate-based painkillers.

This, however, may be changing. It turns out that athletes are hitting more than just balls these days — many are also hitting the bong to ease pain arising from injuries and, sometimes, to tone down their aggressiveness.

In a recent post for The Denver Post’s new all-marijuana extra, The Cannabist, Lucas Fiser, a  freelance writer for The Denver Post and a cannabis consumer, shared his experience using marijuana before an athletic event.

Fiser first tried using marijuana before a championship collegiate club soccer match in 2010. He wrote that while he was normally a very competitive player, with an impressive slew of yellow cards to prove his on-field aggression, he felt very calm during that particular game.

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Cannabis Cures Cancer, Marijuana Touted as Miracle Drug

Touted by physicians worldwide as a “miracle” drug, marijuana has proven effective in the treatment of Cancer, Crohn’s disease, decompensated cirrhosis, chronic pain, nail patella, glaucoma, HIV/Aids, anorexia, Alzheimer’s Disease, ALS, Autism, intractable skeletal muscular spasticity, Hepatitis C, severe muscle spasms including Multiple Sclerosis, painful peripheral neuropathy, seizures, epilepsy, severe nausea, and cachexia.

As a diverse array of medical research studies substantiate the health benefits of medical marijuana, more and more countries and cultures are turning to cannabis to treat the escalating number of patients diagnosed with cancer: one of the most dreadful diseases known to man.

Todays headlines in The Telegraph announces Britian’s new policy to go easy on drug trafficers that are moving marijuana for medical purposes reporting, Sentencing guidelines issued today say that offenders who play a “limited” role in gangs could face community orders for intent to supply Class A drugs. Dealers caught with 6kg of cannabis, valued at £17,000 and enough to fill 30,000 joints or keep an average user in supply for 17 years, could also avoid prison. The sentences on drug “mules” will be cut substantially, while workers in small cannabis “farms” could escape custody. Courts will be told for the first time to reduce sentences for cannabis possession if it is being used for medicinal purposes.”

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700 medical cannabis studies sorted by disease

Medical marijuana uses – 700 medical marijuana clinical studies and papers

NEW! Now in PDF form 700 clinical studies PDF andHERE

 

700 uses of Medical Marijuana | Sorted by Disease | ADD – Wilson’s Disease | Links to 700 Clinical Studies | Medical Marijuana Reference | Cannabis as Medicine

Medical marijuana and cannabis studies A collection of clinical studies, papers and reference providing the ultimate resource for medical disorders helped by medical marijuana.

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The Power of RAW Cannabis is Turning Heads

Raw cannabis is considered by many experts as a dietary essential. As a powerful anti-inflammatory and antioxidant, some classify it as one of the most important plants on earth. The biggest benefits from the plant may come not by smoking it, but rather by consuming it in its raw and natural form. So what’s the difference?

CBD (Cannabidiol), one of the main constituents of the cannabis plant has been proven medically to relieve many diseases including the inhibition of cancer cell growth. Recent studies have shown it to be an effective atypical anti-psychotic in treating schizophrenia. CBD also interferes with the amount of THC your brain processes, balancing the psychotropic effect of marijuana.

A British company, GW Pharma, is in advanced clinical trials for theworld’s first pharmaceutical developed from raw marijuana instead of synthetic equivalents and they say they’ll have a mouth spray to treat cancer pain on pharmacy shelves by 2013. 

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Marijuana research hampered by access from government and politics, scientists say

Millions of ordinary Americans are now able to walk into a marijuana dispensary and purchase bags of pot on the spot for a variety of medical ailments. But if you’re a researcher like Sue Sisley, a psychiatrist who studies post-
traumatic stress disorder, getting access to the drug isn’t nearly so easy.

That’s because the federal government has a virtual monopoly on growing and cultivating marijuana for scientific research, and getting access to the drug requires three separate levels of approval.

Sisley’s fight to get samples for her study — now in its fourth month — illuminates the complex politics of marijuana in the United States.

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UA doctor gets key federal support for marijuana research

PHOENIX — A University of Arizona doctor has been given approval from a key government agency to conduct studies that could put the school at the forefront of medical-marijuana research.

The Public Health Service has said Dr. Suzanne Sisley can proceed with her plans to study whether the drug, which remains illegal under federal law, could be used to treat people with post-traumatic stress disorder. Sisley said this would be the first-ever study of its kind.

That approval, which came late last week, is not the final hurdle. She still needs permission from the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration.

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